Amon Carter’s ‘Emancipation’ artists focus on how artwork helps us reckon with historical past

    Amon Carter’s ‘Emancipation’ artists focus on how artwork helps us reckon with historical past

    Video by Lola Gomez. Edited by Samantha Guzman.

    The Amon Carter Museum’s new exhibition “Emancipation: The Unfinished Mission of Liberation,” asks seven up to date Black artists to look at what freedom and liberation seems like in the present day for Black People. Artists have been requested to answer The Freedman, which was initially sculpted by John Quincy Adams Ward in 1863 earlier than the top of the Civil Conflict. Alfred Conteh, Letitia Huckaby and Jeffrey Meris are three of the artists featured within the exhibit. They share perception into their work and ideas on what position artwork ought to play in serving to us perceive historical past.

    Who can reclaim historical past? Viewers can resolve at Amon Carter’s new ‘Emancipation’ exhibit

    “Emancipation: The Unfinished Mission of Liberation” is on view on the Amon Carter Museum of American Artwork in Fort Price by way of July 9. The exhibition can even tour in three different cities: New Orleans; Williamstown, Mass.; and Savannah, Ga. Discover extra data at www.cartermuseum.org.

    Arts Entry is an arts journalism collaboration powered by The Dallas Morning Information and KERA.

    Amon Carter’s ‘Emancipation’ artists focus on how artwork helps us reckon with historical past

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